Patenting Culture in Scandinavian Countries and Germany in Respect to Lithuania. Part II

Author : dr. Jacekas Antulis, Associated Partner, Head of the Patent Division at METIDA

IMG_0291In this second part of the blog text on the subject “Patenting Culture of Twenty Years in Europe” we will try to compare Lithuania, Scandinavian countries and Germany.

In the first part of the blog: (https://metidalawfirm.wordpress.com/2016/07/14/20-ties-metu-patentavimo-kultura-europoje-baltijos-saliu-analize-i-dalis/) analysing the patenting culture of the Baltic States, we applied a theoretical model which allowed comparing the patenting intensity in each country in relative units by applying a rationing procedure in a sufficiently objective manner. Thus, we have analysed and compared the characteristics of patenting in the Baltic States in detail.

In this blog text, we will try to review and compare Lithuania and other European countries. First of all, we will review the trends in patenting prevailing in Germany, since it is assumed that this country has developed a high level of patenting culture. In pursuance of evaluation of the patenting situation in a more objective manner, we will first look at the changes in the population of Germany during the last 10 years (Table 1):

Germany (year)

Population (million)
Average value (million)
   

81.534

2006

82.44
2007

82.31

2008

82.22
2009

82.00

2010

81.80
2011

81.75

2012

80.33
2013

80.52

2014

80.77
2015

81.20

Table 1. Population in Germany during the period from 2006 to 2015

As far as we can see, the population in Germany has not significantly changed over the last ten years: on the one hand, a slight decrease in the population has naturally occurred (like in the majority of the European countries); on the other hand, a major immigration to Germany has occurred which has partially compensated for this “loss”.

The patenting intensity in Lithuania and Germany is described below, expressed in relative units on the basis of the model introduced in the previous blog text and the respective estimations (the number of inventions per million people is calculated, taking into account the number of patent applications and population) (Table 2):

Year

Lithuania, intensity in relative units

Germany, intensity in relative units

1996

32.31 518.80
1997 40.39

544.56

1998

43.30 570.31
1999 27.79 613.24

2000

 21.32 634.09

2001

 21.97 613.24
2002  27.46 583.81

2003

 20.68 586.26
2004  22.62 593.62

2005

 21.97 593.62
2006  21.00 588.71

2007

 20.03 587.48
2008  28.11  603.43

2009

 29.40  587.48
2010  34.89  576.45

2011

 30.05 576.45
2012  35.22 571.54

2013

 37.80 581.35
2014  39.74 591.16

Table 2. Patenting intensity in Lithuania and Germany

Table 2 suggests that the patenting intensity in Germany is particularly high and Germany is ahead of Lithuania by as much as tens of times. As the difference is so great, in order to assess the patenting situation in an unbiased manner, an additional rationing procedure should be applied: the value of the patenting intensity of Germany should be divided from the value of patenting intensity of Lithuania (Table 3):

Year

       Germany/Lithuania

1996

16.1
1997

13.5

1998

13.2
1999

22.1

2000

29.7
2001

27.9

2002

21.3
2003

28.3

2004

26.2
2005

27.0

2006

28.0
2007

29.3

2008

21.5
2009

20.0

2010

16.5
2011

19.2

2012

16.2
2013

15.4

2014

14.9

Table 3. Patenting intensity in Germany in respect to Lithuania

Table 3 shows how many times the patenting intensity of Germany is higher than the patenting intensity of Lithuania. It may be assumed that the patenting intensity of Lithuania is rather low as compared with Germany; nevertheless, the comparison of years 2012–2014 suggests that the difference has gradually decreased.

 Now let us turn to the patenting situation in Scandinavian countries (Sweden, Finland and Norway).

Year

Lithuania Sweden Finland

Norway

1996

32.31 438.21 405.20 263.48
1997 40.39 440.35 438.66

257.35

1998

43.30 423.29 459.11 247.14
1999 27.79 441.41 466.54

273.69

2000

21.32 449.94 479.55 267.57
2001 21.97 419.02 444.24

243.06

2002

27.46 358.25 401.49 241.01
2003 20.68 323.06 366.17

220.59

2004

22.62 295.34 373.61 232.84
2005 21.97 268.69 340.15

232.84

2006

21.00 261.22 338.29 228.76
2007 20.03 269.75 334.57

251.23

2008

28.11 271.88 334.57 234.89
2009 29.40 233.50 336.43

255.31

2010

34.89 234.57 321.56 228.76
2011 30.05 213.24 306.69

228.76

2012

35.22 244.16 315.99 206.29
2013 37.80 248.43 297.40

224.67

2014

39.74 211.11 263.94

226.72

Table 4. Patenting intensity in Lithuania, Sweden, Finland and Norway

The second rationing stage (including Germany) has shown the following results:

Year

Sweden/Lithuania Finland/Lithuania Norway/Lithuania

Germany/Lithuania

1996

13.56 12.54 8.15 16.10
1997 10.90 10.86 6.37

13.50

1998

9.78 10.60 5.71 13.20
1999 15.88 16.79 9.85

22.10

2000

21.10 22.49 12.55 29.70
2001 19.07 20.22 11.06

27.90

2002

13.05 14.62 8.78 21.30
2003 15.62 17.71 10.67

28.30

2004

13.06 16.52 10.29 26.20
2005 12.23 15.48 10.60

27.00

2006

12.44 16.11 10.89 28.00
2007 13.47 16.70 12.54

29.30

2008

9.67 11.90 8.36 21.50
2009 7.94 11.44 8.68

20.00

2010

6.72 9.22 6.56 16.50
2011 7.10 10.21 7.61

19.20

2012

6.93 8.97 5.86 16.20
2013 6.57 7.87 5.94

15.40

2014

5.31 6.64 5.71

14.90

Table 5. Patenting intensity in Germany, Sweden, Finland and Norway in respect to Lithuania

Table 5 suggests that the patenting intensity in Lithuania is rather low as compared with Germany or Scandinavian countries. It may be noted that in Germany, the national patenting culture is rather stable and has remained the same as 20 years ago. However, the analysis of the Scandinavian countries has disclosed that currently they are going through a difficult period, since the number of national applications in the countries has significantly decreased, and in the recent 20 years, the number of national applications has dropped by as much as 2.55 times in Sweden, 1.88 times in Finland and by 1.42 times in Norway (in respect to Lithuania). Certainly, some positive trends have already been noticed in the Scandinavian countries: the analysis of population has shown that in the recent ten years, the population has consistently increased in all the Scandinavian countries: from 9.05 million to 9.75 million in Sweden, from 5.27 million to 5.49 million in Finland, from 4.64 million to 5.17 million in Norway. We can also see that earlier, Norway would be significantly behind Sweden and Finland according to its patenting intensity, but in recent years the situation has substantially changed: in practice, the patenting intensity of all three Scandinavian countries has become the same, but Sweden has dropped from the first position to the last position, losing its leading position to Finland, and Norway has moved to a higher position.

The analysis carried out suggests that the Baltic States should follow the example of Germany and our neighbours in Scandinavia. Thus, we should make significant progress and take serious actions in order to strengthen the protection of our unique products in Europe and the rest of the world.

In other blog texts on the subject “Patenting Culture of Twenty Years in Europe”, we will examine the patenting situation of the Baltic region in respect to Europe and the Asian countries in detail.

 

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Įrašas paskelbtas temoje Patentai | Patents, Uncategorized ir pažymėtas , , .Išsisaugokite pastovią nuorodą.

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